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Monday, October 03, 2005

Orangutans

This post will remain at the top of the page for the next week. See below for new posts from the Norway adventure

There have been an awful lot of human tragedies recently. In fact there always are, it is an on-going problem that we always face wars, natural disasters and brutal dictators. Sad but true.
It seems that there is always one more charity to donate to help elleviate yet another terrible situation.

I say this because when I first started to write this post Hurricane Katrina battered Louisiana and surrounding states. I decided to put off this post until later, even though it was inspired by this story that came out at that time.

The great apes are disappearing. Some species could be gone within our lifetime. Current guesses place the total number of Sumatran Orangutan at 7300 in the wild. Now consider the population of the UK: ~60.5 million. The number of Sumatran Orangutans equals about 0.01% of the population of the UK; that is ~10% of the population of the Isle of Man.

Thankfully the Borneo Orangutan is doing much better at 45000. Well, comparatively better anyway; the number is still 1000 less than the town of Salina, Kansas. Plus that figure has been estimated to have declined 10-fold since the middle of the last century.

The other apes aren't faring too well either. Gorillas in Congo, Nigeria and Camaroon number less than 1000. They are falling prey to hunters after bush meat and have now started to succumb to the ebola virus, as too have Chimpanzees and Bonobos. All in all the future is very, very bleak.


The Diana Fossey Gorrila Fund International
Great Apes Survival Project


My wife and I donate to the International Orangutan foundation and we encourage you to think about donating something to help preserve the great apes.

We foster a young Orangutan called Yoris.

1 comment:

Ryan Somma said...

Thanks for posting this Kav. It's a very important issue as we have so much to learn about our origins from these mammals.

Unfortunately, I don't have much hope for our ability to save these animals in their own environments; although, I do support efforts to do so. I think creating shelters around the world to preserve these fascinating animals may hold more promise.

Like modern evolutionists say, we aren't descendent of apes, we are apes.